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Farms & Fiber Arts: Brunswick, Bath and Waldoboro

MidCoast and Islands
May - October

Morning

Stop by Frosty’s Donuts on Maine Street in Brunswick. Be sure to get there before they sell out!

Maine Fiberarts Visitor Center

Topsham
Year-round exhibits featuring some of Maine’s finest fiber artists. Check the calendar for workshops and grab a studio tour map.

Halcyon Yarn

Bath
Year-round classes and an extensive selection of supplies for all fiber arts.

Noon

Travel to Waldoboro
Take time for a memorable lunch at Morse’s Sauerkraut and browse the European market.

Afternoon

Waldoboro Historical Society Museum

Learn about the history of the hooked rugs.

Day’s End

Check out the event calendar at the Historic Waldo Theater.

Unique Stays

Le Vatout

Waldoboro
Packages here include weaving workshops and mushroom foraging.

Tops’l Farm

Waldoboro
Eat, sleep and play where forest, farm and coast converge.

Did You Know?

Maine and Hooked Rugs

Maine is most likely the origin of hooked rugs — crafting non-woven rugs began in North America in the early 1800s, according to rug historian Mildred Cole Peladeau of Readfield, Maine. Early incidences point to Maine as the hooked rug’s birthplace: The first published account of creating non-woven rugs appeared in a Portland, Maine, newspaper in 1838. Mass producing preprinted rug patterns first became fashionable in Maine in the 1860s, when Edward Sands Frost of Biddeford commercialized rug hooking. The development of Waldoboro hooked rugs, with their distinctive sculpted floral designs and velvety surfaces of deep pile, established Maine as a center of the finest rug-hooking techniques and craftsmanship early in the 20th century. These rugs have since played a significant role in American decorative arts, and craftspeople throughout Maine are still making beautiful, unique hand-hooked rugs to this day.

Pictured: Marguerite Thomas Zorach, Eden, 1917, Wool hooked on burlap backed with linen, Collection of the Farnsworth Art Museum, Gift of Pamela and Elmer Grossman, 2020

Local Tips

Beauchemin Preservation Farm

Waldoboro
Preserving endangered breeds and heritage fruits. Visit the wool room.

Schooner J&E Riggin

Rockland
Get hooked at sea! Set sail on this historic windjammer for one of several knitting or rug-hooking multiday cruises.

Nebo Lodge and Turner Farm

North Haven
Farm-to-table weekends and summer barn dinners on a Maine island!

Medomak Fiber Arts Retreat

Medomak
A week of fiber bliss in Midcoast Maine, annually in July.

Fiber College of Maine on Penobscot Bay

Searsport
The Unraveled Camp Out, a gathering of fiber artists on the coast of Maine each September.

Bartlettyarns

Harmony
Spinning wool yarns for knitting, felting, crochet, weaving and other fiber arts at its historic mill in Harmony since 1821.

Swans Island Blankets

Northport
Gorgeous handwoven woolen blankets from the coast of Maine and artisanal hand-dyed yarns.

Belfast Fiberarts

Belfast
A downtown fiber artists’ maker space. They also offer workshops.

Farmers’ Markets

Stop by one of Midcoast Maine’s farmers’ markets. There are plenty to pick from.

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Beginning May 1, travelers from all states will be able to travel to Maine without providing a negative COVID-19 test result or quarantining, unless otherwise determined by the Maine CDC. If a state experiences a spike in COVID-19 cases, the Maine CDC will apply testing and quarantine protocols to all travelers from that state.

Learn how our safe travel protocols are helping ensure everyone's visit is a safe one.